Thriving in the Workplace - The importance of mental health to overall well-being and academic and professional success - TAW

The 2014 Workplace Experience Survey results indicate that only about half of staff and faculty are comfortable raising issues in the workplace related to their mental health and wellbeing.On the Vancouver campus, we are encouraging faculty and staff to 'Be Myself at Work' and engage in conversations about mental health and wellbeing by offering the below free, one-hour lunch & learn, presented by Emily Rugel, Ph.D candidate in the School of Population & Public Health.


As humans, we have an innate connection with nature: it soothes us, reminds of our role in the broader ecological network, and connects us back to our roots as forest-dwelling primates. Exploring this innate tendency, termed 'biophilia' by E.O. Wilson, a large body of research has been developed over the past few decades linking nature to human health benefits, and to mental health benefits in particular.

In this workshop, we'll highlight some of the most interesting findings from the field; discuss the importance of mental health to overall well-being and academic and professional success; and describe ways busy people can integrate nature into their day, both at work and at home.

About the Presenter

Emily Rugel's research broadly explores the association between health and place. Her specific interests include disparities in access to health-promoting urban resources and the impact of natural spaces on mental health. To advance these efforts, she harnesses the power of geographic information systems (GIS) and interdisciplinary partnerships alongside more traditional tools. A Ph.D. candidate in the School of Population & Public Health, she firmly believes in the acquisition of knowledge through chance encounters as well as classroom instruction.

For more information

Contact Colin Hearne